Fashion: The Age Old ‘Plus Size’ Debate and the Hopes for a Revolution in the Fashion Industry

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Over the last few weeks, people have been flocking to their social media accounts in masses in outrage over the labeling of healthy women as ‘plus sized’ models.

In Britain, any woman above a size 8 is deemed ‘plus size’, yet the average size of British women is a size 14 and often well within their BMI spectrum (not the greatest measurement of health but the standard).

In my opinion, use of the word ‘plus’ connotes and infers that these women are of an additional weight and thus are overweight, which they are certainly not.

Australian and Italian model Stefania Ferrario  is a healthy British size ten, yet is still considered ‘plus sized’ in the fashion industry.

I am sorry, but how is Stefania Ferrario in any way ‘plus sized’? She is so beautifully figured it makes me (and probably many more women) weep, perfectly toned curves with the grace and morals to match.

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Many of these models are actively uniting to challenge the fashion industry and their crass beauty standards and ideals. They hope to revolutionise them and drop the term ‘plus size’ entirely, consistently proving themselves to be acting as positive role models for young girls and women globally, and this needs to happen.

Personally, I believe only ‘healthy’ (by medical standards) models should be presented, the promotion of anything else is never good for the impressionable who often aspire to meet these skewed beauty standards.

Saying this, I do understand that women can be naturally smaller or larger, but those who go to extremes to maintain their weight should not be the visual representation presented by the world of fashion.

Traditionally, the reason slender women are often used to represent fashion designer clothes on the runway is because their slim frame proves similar to the designers initial 2d sketches. Which enabled designers to envision the finished visual result.

However, these models are  not reflective of the women across society who are the consumers of the fashion industries products.

Fronted by Australian actress and TV personality, Ajay Rochester, these modelling activists have inspired the viral Twitter campaign #droptheplus, in a bid to gain worldwide attention, recognition and action from the fashion industry.

Stafania Love Your Curves

French MPs have now legally banned the use of ‘ultra-thin‘ models on catwalks in France.

Those who hire models who do not meet the legislated standards face fines of nearly €75,000 (around £55,000) and possible imprisonment of up to 6 months.

All models will have to have a BMI of at least 18 (as anything under is considered underweight) and a minimum weight of 8 stone, 9 pounds at a height of 5 foot, 7 inches.

At the end of the day, many models continue to not be representative of the spectrum of sizes of women in society.

Ideally, I’d like to see ‘plus size’ diminished entirely and ‘healthy’ sizing to be promoted everywhere.

What is your opinion on the matter? Are the French correct in banning underweight models?

Stephanie xox